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The University of Oxford announced today that it has expanded a strategic collaboration with Janssen Biotech, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The agreement was facilitated by Johnson & Johnson Innovation

Launched in 2021, the Cartography collaboration aims to develop a cellular map of genes and proteins implicated across a range of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and characterize pharmacologically relevant therapeutic targets.

Acknowledging the broad impact of immune mechanisms, Oxford is now expanding this ground-breaking work with Janssen to encompass diverse disorders prioritized by the highest unmet need, ranging from immune mediated disorders across several organs, cancer and neurodegeneration.

The three-year expansion adds four new areas: Infectious Disease, Vaccines, Oncology and Neuroscience. These areas will utilize the infrastructure established in the original project to address knowledge gaps in an efficient, multi-faceted approach.

The team of Principal Investigators, Fellows and support roles create a large powerful consortium to tackle the research challenges. Working alongside the current four Postdoctoral Fellows, will be an additional four Fellows focussing on specific disease areas as well as supporting the overall bioinformatics aspects of the programme. This represents a unique opportunity for Fellows and PIs to work on an industrially collaborative project involving multiple departments and disease area strongholds at Janssen all contributing to the large body of data and outcomes.

Read the full story on the Medical Sciences Division website. 

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