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The Oxford Vaccine Group’s Lead Statistician, Professor Merryn Voysey, received the prestigious Australian of the Year in the UK award at a gala dinner recently.

Merryn Voysey (second from right) pictured with (left to right) Doone Roisin Hansen, Tom Hooper and Jamie Dornan - picture credit Albert Palen © Albert Palen

Professor Voysey was honoured by awards organizers the Australia Day Foundation for her successful career as a researcher in vaccinology and work as the lead methodologist for the Oxford vaccine trials.

She said: ‘I’m extremely honoured to receive this award. Medical research is very much a team sport, and the achievements of the last two years were the result of the hard work of many hundreds of people.

‘It was an honour and a privilege to work on the development of this vaccine and to know that so many lives have been saved as a result.’

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

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