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What does it mean to be poor in the UK and around the world? Could we eliminate this kind of inequality or is it an unavoidable part of society? This needs a lot more thought...

Oxplore, the Home of Big Questions, is a digital outreach portal from teh University of Oxford. It aims to engage those from 11 to 18 years with debates and ideas that go beyond what is covered in the school classroom. One of the Big Questions it tackles asks: Could we end poverty?

Oxplore invited Dr Catherine Smith from the Oxford Vaccine Group to approach the issue of poverty from the perspective of vaccination research. Catherine works to develop vaccinations to prevent the spread of life-threatening diseases. In her podcast, she explores how the development of vaccinations has helped the fight against poverty, and she discusses the scientific and social challenges involved in distributing them.

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