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The first successful use of nanoparticles (NPs) for vaccination was reported almost 40 years ago with a virus-like particle-based vaccine against Hepatitis B. Since then, the term NP has been expanded to accommodate a large number of novel nano-sized particles engineered from a range of materials. The great interest in NPs is likely not only a result of the two successful vaccines against hepatitis B and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) that use this technology, but also due to the versatility of those small-sized particles, as indicated by the wide range of applications reported so far, ranging from medicinal and cosmetics to purely technical applications. In this review, we will focus on the use of NPs, especially virus-like particles (VLPs), in the field of vaccines and will discuss their employment as vaccines, antigen display platforms, adjuvants and drug delivery systems.

Original publication

DOI

10.3390/vaccines5010006

Type

Journal article

Journal

Vaccines

Publication Date

14/02/2017

Volume

5

Addresses

The Jenner Institute, Oxford University, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ, UK. ariane.cruzgomes@ndm.ox.ac.uk.