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In a landmark study that may herald a quicker, more tailored treatment for the millions of people around the world living with tuberculosis (TB), UK researchers have shown how our understanding of TB’s genetic code is now so detailed that we can now predict which commonly used anti-TB drugs are best for treating a patient’s infection and which are not.

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NDM

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NDM

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NDM

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NDM

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NDM

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NDM

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