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Oxford vaccinologist Teresa Lambe honoured with Irish Abroad award

A vaccine scientist from the University of Oxford recently received the prestigious Presidential Distinguished Service Award for the Irish Abroad for 2022, which recognises the contribution of members of the Irish diaspora.

Scientists find genetic ‘marker’ linked to serious side-effects from skin cancer treatment

New research from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine has identified a genetic marker that could be used to predict a patient’s risk of developing serious side-effects when undergoing immunotherapy treatment for metastatic melanoma.

Alexandra Preston receives ASH Outstanding Abstract Achievement Award

Alexandra Preston, a doctoral student from MRC Human Immunology Unit (MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine), delivered a plenary talk on 11th December at the ASH Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Research confirms important differences in colorectal cancer patients with a history of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

IBD-associated colorectal cancers were found to occur in younger patients and have worse outcomes. Researchers call for urgent improvement of early detection methods to provide more risk-based and personalised care.

EAVI2020: The Quest for an HIV Vaccine

In this long read published to coincide with International AIDS Day, we explore how an international collaboration – of which the University of Oxford is a key partner – has boosted HIV vaccine research. We thank our partners at Imperial College London for allowing us to reproduce and abridge this article.

Bacterial infections linked to one in eight global deaths, according to GRAM study

Data showing 7.7 million deaths from 33 bacterial infections can guide measures to strengthen health systems, particularly in low-income settings

First evidence drug resistant bacteria can travel from gut to lung, increasing infection risks

A new Oxford University study released during World Antimicrobial Awareness Week has significant findings on how antimicrobial resistance (AMR) arises and persists. The results, published today in Nature Communications, provide the first direct evidence of AMR bacteria migrating from a patient’s gut microbiome to the lungs, increasing the risk of deadly infections.

University of Oxford study provides important insights into TB correlates of protection

Researchers from the University of Oxford have today reported findings from a study that investigated whether previously identified correlates of protection associated with risk of full-blown tuberculosis (TB) disease could also be associated with risk of infection from the bacteria that causes TB - highlighting certain correlates in the process.

Therapeutic HIV vaccine with Oxford technology achieves encouraging results

Jenner

A phase I/IIa clinical trial that the University of Oxford collaborated on has demonstrated that a T-cell therapeutic HIV vaccine was associated with better control of the virus rebound when antiretroviral therapy (ART) was temporarily withdrawn.

Oxford retains top spot for medicine for twelfth consecutive year

Oxford University has been ranked as the world's best institution for clinical and health teaching and research for the twelfth consecutive year in the latest Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

Leducq Foundation grant boosts cardiovascular research

Kennedy

The Leducq Foundation has awarded $7.5 million to researchers at the University of Oxford and their collaborators to advance immunotherapy as a treatment for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the UK.

Night-time blood pressure assessment is found to be important in diagnosing hypertension

Around 15% of people aged 40-75 may have a form of undiagnosed high blood pressure (hypertension) that occurs only at night-time. Because they do not know about this, and therefore are not being treated for it, they are at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease such as stroke, heart failure, and even death, suggests new research from the University of Oxford published in the British Journal of General Practice.

Researchers describe how cancer cells can defend themselves from the consequences of certain genetic defects

DPAG

Researchers in Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics have identified a rescue mechanism that allows cancers to overcome the consequences of inactivating mutations in critically important genes.

The passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

We join with so many others across the country, and the world, in sadness at the passing of Her Majesty Queen. Elizabeth II. The University enjoyed a close relationship with The Queen throughout her reign and gives thanks for her 70 years of service to the nation.

Malaria booster vaccine continues to meet WHO-specified 75% efficacy goal

Researchers from the University of Oxford and their partners have today reported new findings from their Phase 2b trial following the administration of a booster dose of the candidate malaria vaccine, R21/Matrix-M™ – which previously demonstrated high-level efficacy of 77% over the following 12 months in young west African children in 2021.

Study raises hope of pre-school type 1 diabetes screening programme

Paediatrics

Researchers in Oxford have launched the first UK study in the general population to test for early markers of type 1 diabetes before children develop symptoms or need insulin.

Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow

Researchers from the University of Oxford, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, and the Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden, have found that individual prostate tumours contain a previously unknown range of genetic variation.

Viral role in Alzheimer's Disease discovered

Researchers from Oxford’s Institute of Population Ageing, Tufts University and the University of Manchester have discovered that common viruses appear to play a role in some cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Promising Marburg vaccine yet to be tested on humans due to lack of funding

Paediatrics

Oxford University’s Professor Teresa Lambe, the designer of the vaccine, fears Marburg disease is ‘now being seen in places where it’s never been seen before’

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