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Researchers describe how cancer cells can defend themselves from the consequences of certain genetic defects

DPAG

Researchers in Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics have identified a rescue mechanism that allows cancers to overcome the consequences of inactivating mutations in critically important genes.

The passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

We join with so many others across the country, and the world, in sadness at the passing of Her Majesty Queen. Elizabeth II. The University enjoyed a close relationship with The Queen throughout her reign and gives thanks for her 70 years of service to the nation.

Malaria booster vaccine continues to meet WHO-specified 75% efficacy goal

Researchers from the University of Oxford and their partners have today reported new findings from their Phase 2b trial following the administration of a booster dose of the candidate malaria vaccine, R21/Matrix-M™ – which previously demonstrated high-level efficacy of 77% over the following 12 months in young west African children in 2021.

Study raises hope of pre-school type 1 diabetes screening programme

Paediatrics

Researchers in Oxford have launched the first UK study in the general population to test for early markers of type 1 diabetes before children develop symptoms or need insulin.

Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow

Researchers from the University of Oxford, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, and the Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden, have found that individual prostate tumours contain a previously unknown range of genetic variation.

Viral role in Alzheimer's Disease discovered

Researchers from Oxford’s Institute of Population Ageing, Tufts University and the University of Manchester have discovered that common viruses appear to play a role in some cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Promising Marburg vaccine yet to be tested on humans due to lack of funding

Paediatrics

Oxford University’s Professor Teresa Lambe, the designer of the vaccine, fears Marburg disease is ‘now being seen in places where it’s never been seen before’

New rabies vaccine candidate demonstrates promising immune response and safety

Researchers from the University of Oxford have today reported new findings from a Phase 1 clinical trial studying the immune response and safety of their newly-developed single shot rabies vaccine, ChAdOx2 RabG - with promising results identified.

Oxford vaccine saved most lives in its first year of rollout

Jenner

When the University of Oxford developed a vaccine that was effective against COVID-19, ensuring that it could be rolled out globally and in perpetuity for low- and middle-income countries was of paramount importance.

Early life infection increases sensitivity to pain in newborn babies

Paediatrics

Researchers from Oxford’s Department of Paediatrics have discovered that infection can increase a baby’s sensitivity to pain, which may last longer than the infection.

New cross-disciplinary medical research building opens in Oxford

The University of Oxford's newest research institute, the Institute of Developmental & Regenerative Medicine (IDRM), has been officially opened, launching the first institute of its kind in the world to physically merge developmental biology and regenerative medicine to treat some of the world's most prolific diseases.

Novel all-in-one vaccine developed to tackle future coronavirus threats

Up to $30 million in funding has been announced by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to bring a new nanoparticle vaccine offering protection against a range of coronaviruses to clinical trial.

Understanding the interplay of dietary iron, anaemia and the immune system

WIMM

Four related projects aim to unravel how the iron we eat shapes how the immune system develops and responds to vaccines.

Higher rate of COVID-19 death before vaccination linked to certain common inflammatory immune conditions

People with certain inflammatory immune conditions affecting the joints, bowel and skin, such as rheumatoid arthritis, may have been more at risk of dying or needing hospital care if they got COVID-19 before vaccination compared with the general population, according to a new study published in The Lancet Rheumatology with the involvement of researchers from the University of Oxford.

Oxford expands the Cartography collaboration with Janssen

NDM Paediatrics

The University of Oxford announced today that it has expanded a strategic collaboration with Janssen Biotech, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The agreement was facilitated by Johnson & Johnson Innovation

Multiplex Serology: the first step towards looking at 20 infectious agents in half a million people

NDM

Certain infectious agents are recognised causes of cancer and other chronic diseases. To understand the pathological mechanisms underlying such relationships, we designed a Multiplex Serology platform to measure quantitative antibody responses against 45 antigens from 20 infectious agents.

Developmental dynamics of the neural crest–mesenchymal axis in creating the thymic microenvironment

Paediatrics

A new paper from researchers at the Department of Paediatrics and the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences has shown that fibroblasts in the thymus, often considered simply as dull “structural” cells, are much more complex than previously thought.

Medical Sciences Division receives REF 2021 results

Today the UK Funding Bodies have published the outcomes of the recent national research assessment exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021. REF is the UK-wide assessment of research in universities, and provides an expert evaluation of the quality of the research outputs, impact and environment at subject level in each university.

Oxford scientist named Australian of the Year in the UK

Jenner Paediatrics

The Oxford Vaccine Group’s Lead Statistician, Professor Merryn Voysey, received the prestigious Australian of the Year in the UK award at a gala dinner recently.

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