Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Human campylobacteriosis exhibits a distinctive seasonality in temperate regions. This paper aims to identify the origins of this seasonality. Clinical isolates [typed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST)] and epidemiological data were collected from Scotland. Young rural children were found to have an increased burden of disease in the late spring due to strains of non-chicken origin (e.g. ruminant and wild bird strains from environmental sources). In contrast the adult population had an extended summer peak associated with chicken strains. Travel abroad and UK mainland travel were associated with up to 17% and 18% of cases, respectively. International strains were associated with chicken, had a higher diversity than indigenous strains and a different spectrum of MLST types representative of these countries. Integrating empirical epidemiology and molecular subtyping can successfully elucidate the seasonal components of human campylobacteriosis. The findings will enable public health officials to focus strategies to reduce the disease burden.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/S0950268812002063

Type

Journal article

Journal

Epidemiol Infect

Publication Date

06/2013

Volume

141

Pages

1267 - 1275

Keywords

Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Animals, Animals, Wild, Birds, Campylobacter Infections, Chickens, Child, Child, Preschool, Humans, Incidence, Middle Aged, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Rural Population, Scotland, Seasons, Travel, Urban Population, Young Adult