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Adenovirus vaccine vectors generated from new viral serotypes are routinely screened in pre-clinical laboratory animal models to identify the most immunogenic and efficacious candidates for further evaluation in clinical human and veterinary settings. Here, we show that studies in a laboratory species do not necessarily predict the hierarchy of vector performance in other mammals. In mice, after intramuscular immunization, HAdV-5 (Human adenovirus C) based vectors elicited cellular and humoral adaptive responses of higher magnitudes compared to the chimpanzee adenovirus vectors ChAdOx1 and AdC68 from species Human adenovirus E. After HAdV-5 vaccination, transgene specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cell responses reached peak magnitude later than after ChAdOx1 and AdC68 vaccination, and exhibited a slower contraction to a memory phenotype. In cattle, cellular and humoral immune responses were at least equivalent, if not higher, in magnitude after ChAdOx1 vaccination compared to HAdV-5. Though we have not tested protective efficacy in a disease model, these findings have important implications for the selection of candidate vectors for further evaluation. We propose that vaccines based on ChAdOx1 or other Human adenovirus E serotypes could be at least as immunogenic as current licensed bovine vaccines based on HAdV-5.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.042

Type

Journal article

Journal

Vaccine

Publication Date

25/02/2015

Volume

33

Pages

1121 - 1128

Keywords

Vaccine immunology, Viral vector, Adenoviridae, Animals, Animals, Laboratory, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cattle, Drug Carriers, Genetic Vectors, Interferon-gamma, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Recombinant Proteins, Transgenes, Vaccines, Synthetic, Viral Vaccines