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T1DBase (http://T1DBase.org) [Smink et al. (2005) Nucleic Acids Res., 33, D544-D549; Burren et al. (2004) Hum. Genomics, 1, 98-109] is a public website and database that supports the type 1 diabetes (T1D) research community. T1DBase provides a consolidated T1D-oriented view of the complex data world that now confronts medical researchers and enables scientists to navigate from information they know to information that is new to them. Overview pages for genes and markers summarize information for these elements. The Gene Dossier summarizes information for a list of genes. GBrowse [Stein et al. (2002) Genome Res., 10, 1599-1610] displays genes and other features in their genomic context, and Cytoscape [Shannon et al. (2003) Genome Res., 13, 2498-2504] shows genes in the context of interacting proteins and genes. The Beta Cell Gene Atlas shows gene expression in beta cells, islets, and related cell types and lines, and the Tissue Expression Viewer shows expression across other tissues. The Microarray Viewer shows expression from more than 20 array experiments. The Beta Cell Gene Expression Bank contains manually curated gene and pathway annotations for genes expressed in beta cells. T1DMart is a query tool for markers and genotypes. PosterPages are ’home pages’ about specific topics or datasets. The key challenge, now and in the future, is to provide powerful informatics capabilities to T1D scientists in a form they can use to enhance their research.

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/nar/gkl933

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nucleic Acids Res

Publication Date

01/2007

Volume

35

Pages

D742 - D746

Keywords

Animals, Databases, Genetic, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Internet, Mice, Pancreas, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Rats, Systems Integration, User-Computer Interface