Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

To fully understand the allelic variation that underlies common diseases, complete genome sequencing for many individuals with and without disease is required. This is still not technically feasible. However, recently it has become possible to carry out partial surveys of the genome by genotyping large numbers of common SNPs in genome-wide association studies. Here, we outline the main factors - including models of the allelic architecture of common diseases, sample size, map density and sample-collection biases - that need to be taken into account in order to optimize the cost efficiency of identifying genuine disease-susceptibility loci.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/nrg1522

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nat Rev Genet

Publication Date

02/2005

Volume

6

Pages

109 - 118

Keywords

Animals, Computational Biology, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Sequence Analysis, DNA