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Artificial light and power frequency magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the built environment. Light is a potent zeitgeber but it is unclear whether power frequency magnetic fields can influence circadian rhythm control. To study this possibility, 8-12-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 30 min starting at zeitgeber time 14 (ZT14, 2 h into the dark period of the day) to 50 Hz magnetic fields at 580 μT using a pair of Helmholtz coils and/or a blue LED light at 700 lux or neither. Our experiments revealed an acute adrenal response to blue light, in terms of increased adrenal per1 gene expression, increased serum corticosterone levels, increased time spent sleeping, and decreased locomotor activity (in all cases, P < 0.0001) compared to an unexposed control group. There appeared to be no modulating effect of the magnetic fields on the response to light, and there was also no effect of the magnetic fields alone (in both cases, P > 0.05) except for a decrease in locomotor activity (P < 0.03). Gene expression of the cryptochromes cry1 and cry2 in the adrenals, liver, and hippocampus was also not affected by exposures (in all cases, P > 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that 50 Hz magnetic fields do not significantly affect the acute light response to a degree that can be detected in the adrenal response. Bioelectromagnetics. 2019;9999:XX-XX. © 2019 Bioelectromagnetics Society.

Original publication

DOI

10.1002/bem.22188

Type

Journal article

Journal

Bioelectromagnetics

Publication Date

05/2019

Volume

40

Pages

250 - 259

Keywords

ELF, animals, behavior, biological clock, clock genes